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BRITBASE - British Chess Game Archive

Tournament: 47th British Chess Championship • 31 games out of 198, plus 9 part-games, plus 3 plus 2 part-games from subsidiary events
Venue: Leicester • Dates: 15-26 August 1960 • Download PGN • Last Edited: Monday 7 May, 2018 4:14 PM

1960 British Chess Championship

  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Total
1 Penrose,Jonathan ◊ 1/13 ♦ 1/18 ◊ ½/2 ♦ ½/7 ◊ 1/24 ◊ 1/6 ♦ 1/4 ♦ ½/5 ◊ ½/3 ♦ 1/16 ◊ ½/8 8.5 / 11
2 Alexander,C Hugh O'D ♦ 1/23 ◊ 1/14 ♦ ½/1 ◊ ½/5 ♦ ½/4 ♦ 1/11 ◊ 0/6 ◊ ½/3 ♦ 1/9 ◊ 1/7 ♦ ½/12 7.5 / 11
3 Haygarth,Michael John ♦ ½/4 ◊ ½/15 ◊ 1/35 ♦ ½/30 ◊ 0/11 ♦ 1/8 ◊ 1/13 ♦ ½/2 ♦ ½/1 ◊ 1/6 ◊ 1/5 7.5 / 11
4 Golombek,Harry ◊ ½/3 ♦ 1/24 ◊ ½/7 ♦ 1/16 ◊ ½/2 ♦ 1/13 ◊ 0/1 ◊ 1/15 ♦ ½/6 ♦ ½/5 ◊ ½/11 7.0 / 11
5 Barden,Leonard William ◊ 1/29 ♦ 1/22 ◊ 1/11 ♦ ½/2 ♦ 0/6 ◊ 1/9 ♦ 1/25 ◊ ½/1 ♦ ½/7 ◊ ½/4 ♦ 0/3 7.0 / 11
6 Lloyd,Kenneth William ◊ 1/33 ♦ ½/12 ◊ ½/8 ♦ 1/18 ◊ 1/5 ♦ 0/1 ♦ 1/2 ◊ ½/7 ◊ ½/4 ♦ 0/3 ♦ 1/14 7.0 / 11
7 Clarke,Peter Hugh ♦ ½/15 ◊ 1/31 ♦ ½/4 ◊ ½/1 ♦ 1/14 ♦ ½/30 ◊ 1/11 ♦ ½/6 ◊ ½/5 ♦ 0/2 ◊ 1/17 7.0 / 11
8 Abrahams,Gerald ♦ ½/10 ◊ 1/21 ♦ ½/6 ◊ ½/25 ♦ ½/26 ◊ 0/3 ♦ 1/31 ◊ 0/9 ♦ 1/15 ◊ 1/12 ♦ ½/1 6.5 / 11
9 Hollis,Adrian Swayne ♦ 0/12 ◊ 1/33 ♦ ½/22 ◊ 1/17 ◊ 1/21 ♦ 0/5 ◊ ½/14 ♦ 1/8 ◊ 0/2 ♦ ½/10 ◊ 1/16 6.5 / 11
10 Beach,Thomas John ◊ ½/8 ♦ ½/17 ♦ 0/21 ◊ 1/32 ♦ 1/34 ◊ 0/25 ♦ 1/26 ◊ ½/18 ♦ ½/14 ◊ ½/9 ◊ 1/19 6.5 / 11
11 Aitken,James Macrae ◊ 1/19 ♦ 1/26 ♦ 0/5 ◊ ½/12 ♦ 1/3 ◊ 0/2 ♦ 0/7 ♦ ½/24 ◊ ½/13 ◊ 1/25 ♦ ½/4 6.0 / 11
12 Cafferty,Bernard ◊ 1/9 ◊ ½/6 ♦ ½/25 ♦ ½/11 ◊ 0/13 ♦ ½/24 ◊ ½/16 ♦ 1/30 ◊ 1/17 ♦ 0/8 ◊ ½/2 6.0 / 11
13 Fazekas,Stefan ♦ 0/1 ◊ 1/27 ♦ 1/15 ◊ ½/14 ♦ 1/12 ◊ 0/4 ♦ 0/3 ◊ ½/19 ♦ ½/11 ◊ ½/23 ◊ ½/20 5.5 / 11
14 Payne,Roland ◊ 1/32 ♦ 0/2 ◊ 1/26 ♦ ½/13 ◊ 0/7 ◊ 1/20 ♦ ½/9 ♦ ½/16 ◊ ½/10 ♦ ½/19 ◊ 0/6 5.5 / 11
15 Parr,Frank ◊ ½/7 ♦ ½/3 ◊ 0/13 ♦ 1/19 ◊ ½/16 ♦ 1/17 ◊ 1/30 ♦ 0/4 ◊ 0/8 ♦ ½/20 ◊ ½/23 5.5 / 11
16 Thomas,Andrew Rowland B ♦ ½/25 ◊ 1/34 ♦ ½/17 ◊ 0/4 ♦ ½/15 ◊ 1/21 ♦ ½/12 ◊ ½/14 ♦ 1/18 ◊ 0/1 ♦ 0/9 5.5 / 11
17 Edwards,Raymond Brunton ♦ ½/20 ◊ ½/10 ◊ ½/16 ♦ 0/9 ♦ 1/22 ◊ 0/15 ♦ 1/28 ◊ 1/25 ♦ 0/12 ◊ 1/18 ♦ 0/7 5.5 / 11
18 Naylor,John William ◊ 1/28 ◊ 0/1 ♦ 1/34 ◊ 0/6 ♦ ½/20 ◊ ½/26 ♦ 1/29 ♦ ½/10 ◊ 0/16 ♦ 0/17 ◊ 1/33 5.5 / 11
19 Wood,Baruch Harold ♦ 0/11 ◊ 1/36 ♦ 0/20 ◊ 0/15 ♦ ½/28 ◊ 1/22 ♦ 1/21 ♦ ½/13 ◊ 1/24 ◊ ½/14 ♦ 0/10 5.5 / 11
20 Newman,Richard Hilary ◊ ½/17 ♦ ½/30 ◊ 1/19 ♦ 0/21 ◊ ½/18 ♦ 0/14 ◊ ½/24 ◊ 1/29 ♦ ½/25 ◊ ½/15 ♦ ½/13 5.5 / 11
21 Pritchard,David Brine ◊ ½/24 ♦ 0/8 ◊ 1/10 ◊ 1/20 ♦ 0/9 ♦ 0/16 ◊ 0/19 ♦ 0/27 ◊ 1/35 ◊ 1/36 ♦ 1/34 5.5 / 11
22 Beaty,John H ♦ 1/27 ◊ 0/5 ◊ ½/9 ♦ 0/24 ◊ 0/17 ♦ 0/19 ◊ 1/36 ♦ ½/28 ◊ 1/31 ♦ ½/26 ◊ 1/35 5.5 / 11
23 Fallone,Michael ◊ 0/2 ♦ 0/32 ♦ ½/29 ◊ 0/31 ♦ ½/33 ◊ 1/35 ◊ ½/27 ♦ 1/34 ◊ 1/30 ♦ ½/13 ♦ ½/15 5.5 / 11
24 Fuller,Ronald A ♦ ½/21 ◊ 0/4 ♦ 1/31 ◊ 1/22 ♦ 0/1 ◊ ½/12 ♦ ½/20 ◊ ½/11 ♦ 0/19 ♦ ½/27 ◊ ½/29 5.0 / 11
25 Hindle,Owen Mark ◊ ½/16 ♦ 1/28 ◊ ½/12 ♦ ½/8 ◊ ½/30 ♦ 1/10 ◊ 0/5 ♦ 0/17 ◊ ½/20 ♦ 0/11 ◊ ½/26 5.0 / 11
26 Lloyd,David Edward ◊ 1/35 ◊ 0/11 ♦ 0/14 ♦ 1/36 ◊ ½/8 ♦ ½/18 ◊ 0/10 ♦ ½/31 ◊ ½/27 ◊ ½/22 ♦ ½/25 5.0 / 11
27 Wheeler,George W ◊ 0/22 ♦ 0/13 ♦ 0/36 ◊ 1/33 ♦ 1/32 ◊ 0/31 ♦ ½/23 ◊ 1/21 ♦ ½/26 ◊ ½/24 ◊ ½/28 5.0 / 11
28 Bruce,Ronald Mackay ♦ 0/18 ◊ 0/25 ♦ 1/33 ♦ 0/29 ◊ ½/19 ♦ 1/36 ◊ 0/17 ◊ ½/22 ♦ ½/34 ◊ 1/30 ♦ ½/27 5.0 / 11
29 Bennett,Patrick ♦ 0/5 ♦ 0/35 ◊ ½/23 ◊ 1/28 ♦ ½/31 ◊ 1/34 ◊ 0/18 ♦ 0/20 ♦ 0/33 ◊ 1/32 ♦ ½/24 4.5 / 11
30 Sergeant,Edward Guthlac ♦ ½/31 ◊ ½/20 ♦ 1/32 ◊ ½/3 ♦ ½/25 ◊ ½/7 ♦ 0/15 ◊ 0/12 ♦ 0/23 ♦ 0/28 ◊ ½/36 4.0 / 11
31 Hall,Arthur ◊ ½/30 ♦ 0/7 ◊ 0/24 ♦ 1/23 ◊ ½/29 ♦ 1/27 ◊ 0/8 ◊ ½/26 ♦ 0/22 ♦ ½/35 ◊ 0/32 4.0 / 11
32 Levens,David G ♦ 0/14 ◊ 1/23 ◊ 0/30 ♦ 0/10 ◊ 0/27 ♦ 1/33 ◊ 0/34 ♦ 0/35 ◊ 1/36 ♦ 0/29 ♦ 1/31 4.0 / 11
33 Watts,John H ♦ 0/6 ♦ 0/9 ◊ 0/28 ♦ 0/27 ◊ ½/23 ◊ 0/32 ♦ 1/35 ♦ 0/36 ◊ 1/29 ◊ 1/34 ♦ 0/18 3.5 / 11
34 Hawson,John B ◊ 1/36 ♦ 0/16 ◊ 0/18 ♦ 1/35 ◊ 0/10 ♦ 0/29 ♦ 1/32 ◊ 0/23 ◊ ½/28 ♦ 0/33 ◊ 0/21 3.5 / 11
35 Malcolm,CM ♦ 0/26 ◊ 1/29 ♦ 0/3 ◊ 0/34 ◊ ½/36 ♦ 0/23 ◊ 0/33 ◊ 1/32 ♦ 0/21 ◊ ½/31 ♦ 0/22 3.0 / 11
36 Thompson,M ♦ 0/34 ♦ 0/19 ◊ 1/27 ◊ 0/26 ♦ ½/35 ◊ 0/28 ♦ 0/22 ◊ 1/33 ♦ 0/32 ♦ 0/21 ♦ ½/30 3.0 / 11

 

1960 British Ladies' Chess Championship

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Total
1 Bruce,Rowena Mary
&;
1 1 1 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 8.5 / 9
2 Sunnucks,Patricia Anne 0
&;
1 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 1 7.5 / 9
3 Hogarth,Leah Margaret 0 0
&;
½ 1 1 ½ 1 1 0 5.0 / 9
4 Wood,Margaret Eileen Eli 0 0 ½
&;
½ 0 1 1 1 1 5.0 / 9
5 Henniker-Heaton,Mary 0 ½ 0 ½
&;
½ ½ ½ 1 1 4.5 / 9
6 Corbyn,Sheila A 0 0 0 1 ½
&;
0 1 1 1 4.5 / 9
7 Steedman,Sarah Margaret 0 0 ½ 0 ½ 1
&;
0 1 1 4.0 / 9
8 Rees,JS (Mrs) ½ 0 0 0 ½ 0 1
&;
0 1 3.0 / 9
9 Maclean,Maria (Dr) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
&;
1 2.0 / 9
10 Feavyour,Evaline Emily 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
&;
1.0 / 9

Women's championship: the draw order was 1 Wood, 2 Bruce, 3 Feavyour, 4 Henniker-Heaton, 5 Rees, 6 Steedman, 7 Sunnucks, 9 Corbyn, 9 Hogarth, 10 Maclean. Rounds 1-5 were played Monday 15th to Friday 19th August, then rounds 6-9 were played Monday 22nd to Thursday 25th August.

British Ladies’ Championship.—Mrs. R. M. Bruce 8½; Miss P. A. Sunnucks 7½; Miss L. M. Hogarth and Miss M. E. E. Wood 5; Miss S. A. Corbyn and Miss M. Henniker-Heaton 4½; Mrs. S. M. Steedman 4; Mrs. J. S. Rees 3½; Dr. M. Maclean 2; Mrs. E. Feavyour 1.

British Boys' [Under 18] Championship.—D. R. Thomson 9; N. J. Argyris, D. A. Smith, and G. Taylor 8½; K. B. Richardson, G. M. Sheldrick, and R. F. T. Wood 8; F. M. Akeroyd, R. A. Beach, A. R. Fersht, D. S. James, and J. E. Scholes 7½; M. Alcock, J. D. T. Boyers, P. C. Chatwin, T. Rickards, S. Rowe, P. G. Wann, and R. Wildig 7; G. H. Davies, K. R. Emerton, S. Grak, D. R. Hopkin, D. C. Jarrett, R. H. Mellor, C. C. Parsons, J. I. P. Simpole, and M. J. Taylor 6½; R. A. M. Allison, J. G. Cooper, A. Footner, A. J. Gillam, R. Hazlewood, R. G. Jones, D. I. W. Reynolds, and N. Stockman 6; P. Bracey, P. Dawson, R. A. Faint, R. A. Fenn. A. Gobran, B. N. Green, I. Roebuck, A. Sadler, G. K. Sandiford, A. N. Walker, and A. Whiteley 5½; C. J. Byrne, J. G. Calvert, C. J. Coombes, P. D. Goodstein, P. Jeal, B. McDonagh, R. A. E. Shaw, A. G. Summers, and G. B. Taylor 5; R. E. Graf, K. McN. Grigor, J. V. Hodgson, and M. March 4½; J. G. Jones 4; B. L. Burton 3½; K. T. Attenborough 1½.

British Boys' Under-fifteen Championship.—V. W. Knox 9½; K. B. McAlpine and D. Parr 9; P. Almond and R. G. Lee 8; G. Chesters and C. North 7½; W. N. Gregory, T. D. Hughes, R. Lancaster, M. H. Miller, P. W. Murphy, I. J. Myall, A. R. Prince, and C. F. Woodcock 7; P. Blackman, R. J. Butcher, R. Keely, and I. Sharpe 6½; J. T. Hearson, D. N. L. Levy, C. Needham, Louis de Veauce, M. Wagstaff, and G. A. Wright 6; G. S. Challand, P. S. Gregory, and C. T. Kent 5½; M. J. Busby, R. J. Neat, P. Parr, M. Walsh, B. Whitehouse, and M. Young 5; G. H. Morley and C. N. Prince 4½; R. Fenn, A. Huxley, D. W. McNamara, and D. Pratt 4; P. Lefley 2½; B. Henshaw (withdrew after eight rounds) 1½.

British Girls’ [Under 18] Championship.—Verina Horsnell 6½; Brita Junker and Marie Tozer 5; Jean Pickles 4½; Gillian Moore 3½; Marcia Syme 1½; Josephina Bradbury and Breeda Heron 1.

Major Open.—J. A. Lawrence 8½; P. B. Cook 8; R. H. Northage, J. E. Povey, and D. G. Wells 7; P. R. Bielby, D. Gould, P. G. Moore, and I. B. N. Smith 6½; P. E. Collier, R. D. Hollands, J. R. Nicolson, R. S. Scowen, R. J. Stockwell, and A. J. Sutton 6; B. Howard, J. D. Mills, and F. N. Stevenson [Stephenson] 5½; D. Lees, P. L. Roe, P. E. Walker, and E. Young 5; C. M. Bloodworth, D. H. Long, and P. B. Sarson 4½; C. R. Gurnhill 4; N. Toon 3½; H. F. Gook 3; B. T. H. Smith (withdrew after eight rounds) 2½; C. Hatch 2½.

First Class.—R. A. A. Brockington, T. O. Marsden, and A. E. Nield 8; R. C. Lovett, A. Milner, R. H. Rushton, and A. T. Watson 6½; Rev. H. M. Blackett, J. A. Feavyour, S. Roberts, and J. P. Whitehouse 6; M. Amey, G. Chesters, and T. V. Parrott 5½; E. G. Exell, P. Griffiths, and G. O. J. Melitus 5; B. J. Ellis (withdrew after seven rounds) 3½; C. J. Arthur (withdrew after eight rounds) 3½; A. Archer 3½; R. Owen (withdrew after nine rounds) 2; W. H. Thomas 1; D. Wilkie—disqualified.

Second Class.—G. A. M. Boswell 7½; F. C. Shorter and A. T. Watts 7; Miss N. F. Harris and J. T. Ralph 6; H. M. Ilsley, D. J. A. Strange, and A. Terrett 4½; L. Benton 3½; Rev. E. Gilbert-Wood 3; F. H. Bath 1½.


[Sunday Times, 14 August 1960] "Chess Test for Boys - By BRUCE HAYDEN - A new record for schoolboy chess is set up in this year’s British Chess Federation’s 13-day Congress which opens tomorrow at Leicester University with 103 competing in the championships for boys under 18 and under 15. A Federation official said: "The Sunday Times national schools championship has undoubtedly encouraged keenness and fostered new interest. It has become one of the Federation’s mainstays in junior chess." In the ten tournaments there are more than 240 players, also a record. The British championship of 11 rounds on the Swiss pairing system has attracted the maximum of 36 competitors. The prize money for the winner is now swollen to £200 by the William Sims bequest. Jonathan Penrose will defend his title against a strong entry oi seasoned experts and ambitious young players. The two former champions, H. Golombek and C. H. O'D. Alexander, are again competing."


[The Times, 15 August 1960] "225 ENTER FOR CHESS CONGRESS - PENROSE THE FAVOURITE - FROM OUR CHESS CORRESPONDENT LEICESTER, Aug. 14 - There is an entry of 225 competitors in the various sections of the annual British Chess Federation Congress which opens tomorrow at Leicester University. The following 34 players are competing in the British championship:—G. Abrahams (Liverpool), Dr. J. M. Aitken (Cheltenham), C. H. O’D. Alexander (Cheltenham), L. W. Barden (London), T. J. Beach (Liverpool), J. H. Beaty (Doncaster), P. Bennett (Newport), R. M. Bruce (Plymouth), B. Cafferty (Birmingham), P, H. Clarke (Ilford), R. B. Edwards (Harrogate), M. Fallone (Hamilton), Dr. S. Fazekas (Buckhurst Hill), R. A. Fuller (Ilford), H. Golombek (Chalfont St Giles), A. Hall (Kenton), J. B. Hawson (London), M. J. Haygarth (Leeds), A. S. Hollis (London), D. G. Levens (Harrow), D. E. Lloyd (London), K. W. Lloyd (Birmingham), C. M. Malcolm (Glasgow), J. W. Naylor (Liverpool), R. H. Newman (London), F. Parr (Sutton), R. Payne (Southend), J. Penrose (London), D. B. Pritchard (Lough), E. G. Sergeant (Kingston Hill), A. R. B. Thomas (Tiverton), M. Thompson (Southampton), G. W. Wheeler (Plymouth), and B. H. Wood (Sutton Coldfield).

"This is a representative entry of almost the full strength of Britain's best players and it should be noted that the three players who tied for first place last year, Golombek, Haygarth, and Penrose, are again competing this time. As well as the defending champion, no fewer than four former champions are playing—Alexander, Barden, Dr. Fazekas and Golombek. Whether the chief opposition to Penrose will come from this group or from such younger players as Clarke, Haygarth or Cafferty only the next two weeks can show. Eleven rounds are to be played on the Swiss system by which players of equal scores are paired against each other.

"The entry for the British ladies’ championship is: Miss M. E. E. Wood (Newbury), Mrs. R. M. Bruce (Plymouth), Mrs. E. Feavyour (Saxmundham), Miss M. Henniker-Heaton (London), Mrs. J. S. Rees (Derby), Miss D. Colmer (London), Mrs. S. M. Steedman (Bothwell), Miss P. A. Sunnucks (London), Miss S. A. Corbyn (Birmingham), Miss L. M. Hogarth (Glasgow), Mrs. D. Bourdillon (London), and Dr. M. Maclean (Abertillery)."


[Manchester Guardian, 15 August 1960 - Leonard Barden] "Alexander at his best could oust Penrose - From our Chess Correspondent - Leicester, Sunday [14 August] - There is a record entry of 230 for the British Chess Federation’s annual congress which begins here tomorrow. The main event, the British championship, is again being run as a tournament on the Swiss system, with 34 players and 11 rounds. Pairings for the first round are made by lot, and thereafter players with equal or similar scores are drawn together. The effect is that the leaders have to meet all their strongest rivals, although cunning competitors have been known to skulk in the rear for several rounds and come up with a rush at the end with wins against weak opponents. The man to beat will be Jonathan Penrose, aged 26, a psychology research student at London University who has held the title for the last two years and is recognised—after his performances in the world team championships and in the recent Madrid zonal contest—as one of the strongest masters in Europe. The world champion Botvinnik advocated several days rest from chess as essential preparation for a tournament, and for the last ten days Penrose has been holidaying in Scotland far from any chess board. - Some outside chances - His most dangerous rivals will probably be Hugh Alexander, of the Foreign Office, Harry Golombek, the referee of the recent world championship match, and Peter Clarke, a London University student. Golombek has the valuable habit of defeating weaker players rapidly and consistently, and last year he almost ran away with the championship until Penrose caught him in the last two rounds. Alexander has recently been prone to rest on his international laurels, but a good result in Switzerland at Easter has revived his enthusiasm. At his best, he is the one player with the talent to outshine Penrose. Clarke could well finish unbeaten, but on previous form he will draw too many games to do better than a place among the four prize winners. Haygarth will be the main Northern hope, while Cafferty is improving year by year and could well reach the prize list. Dr Aitken, Barden, and Parr have an outside chance, but if any of the other players win it will be a dramatic surprise and an uncomfortable moment for the selectors, who have already chosen the team for the next world championships."


[Sunday Times, 21 August 1960 - by C. H. O'D. Alexander] "CHAMPIONSHIP CHANCES - By the time readers see this year’s forecast, the British championship will be halfway through so they can check its accuracy to date. Jonathan Penrose, the twenty-seven-year-old holder, is unquestionably the strongest player, and if he plays in his best form, or near it, should win: I think he will but his slightly uncertain temperament may let him down and—fortunately for the rest of us—there is always luck. Golombek and Clarke have the next best chance. Golombek usually plays well in the championship—he has won three times since the war and is deadly against the weaker players—and Clarke is perhaps the hardest man to beat in the tournament. Golombek has, however, a very bad recent record in individual games with Penrose (four losses in succession) and Clarke draws too many games for a tournament winner. Next I would rate Barden, Haygarth and myself. Barden, like Golombek, usually does well in the championship but I feel some doubts as to his ability to retain the lead if he gets it: he is apt to be unduly nervous in such situations. Haygarth is a vigorous, aggressive player with an excellent temperament and might win: my doubts are whether the quality of his play is quite good enough to score sufficiently heavily against the other strong players. My own play is perhaps a little better than in the last year or two but I do not usually do well in the championship and may be overrating my chances in putting them equal to Barden’s and Haygarth’s. In a strong entry, I do not think anyone else quite good enough to have much chance of winning—but, as I have found in the past, it is very easy to be wrong. Final forecast: 1, Penrose; 2, Golombek and Clarke; 4, Haygarth and Barden."


[Sunday Times, 4 September 1960 - by C. H. O'D. Alexander] "From the point of view of the prospects of British chess there were several good features in this year’s championship. First, there was the victory of Penrose for the third year running, a more decisive win than either of his others, firmly establishing him as the best player in the country. Not since the days of Atkins fifty years ago has anyone won three times in succession and Penrose, still only twenty-six, has clearly not yet reached his full strength. It is an excellent thing for chess in England to have an unquestioned champion for the rest of us to try to unseat: it will be better still if, as is quite possible, Penrose can make a further improvement to reach grandmaster strength. Secondly, there was the general success of the recognised leading players. Haygarth shared second-place with me, and Barden, Clarke and Golombek were fourth equal, with K. W. Lloyd the only "outsider” to get into the prize list. We now have four players in the age range 25 to 31: Haygarth (25), Clarke (26), Penrose (26) and Barden (31) to form a nucleus of our team for many years to come. Finally there were signs of further good young players coming along. K. W. Lloyd (24) did very well indeed: he played all six of the other leaders, winning two, losing two and drawing two, and showed imagination and determination in his play. Payne (23) also played well: he must however show more courage in his play if he is to develop his potential ability fully. Hollis (20) may be potentially the best of the three: he is an imaginative player with a good temperament, but needs more practice against players stronger than himself. These were the good features of the 1960 championship—I will deal with the bad one next Sunday."


[Sunday Times, 11 September 1960 - by C. H. O'D. Alexander] "Last Sunday I discussed the encouraging aspects of this year’s championships and left till this Sunday the one really bad feature—the continued tendency to quick draws, often without any real struggle, between the leading players. Penrose, Haygarth, Clarke, Barden, Golombek and myself in our fourteen games had no fewer than eleven draws: some were hard-fought, but in a number of cases there was a great deal more play left when a draw was agreed. Further there were signs of this disease spreading and, among the younger players, of some draws being agreed without a fight. One reason is that the leading players are all on friendly terms; playing to win against strong players is very hard work, and absence of strong feelings of personal rivalry removes one of the incentives to undertaking it. A second reason is that none of the leading players, among the middle and younger generation, has a highly developed killer-instinct. But to my mind the most important reason is the Swiss system, under which, with thirty to thirty-six players competing in the championship, the leading players can always hope for a number of easier games; this greatly increases the temptation to be quite satisfied to draw with one’s leading rivals and reserve one's real efforts for others. I mentioned above that the six leading competitors scored eleven draws in their fourteen games among themselves; against K. W. Lloyd, who shared fourth place, they scored 2 wins, 2 losses and 2 draws (a fine performance by Lloyd) and against the rest 24 wins, 1 loss and 7 draws—figures that speak for themselves."


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