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John Saunders

 

BRITBASE - British Chess Game Archive

Tournament: 26th British Chess Championship • 34/66 games complete, 4 part-games + 2 from Women's Ch'ship
Venue: Hastings Chess Club • Dates: 31 July - 11 August 1933 • Download PGN • Updated: Wednesday 12 June, 2019 5:42 PM

1933 British Chess Championship

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Pts
1 Sultan Khan,Mir
&;
½ 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 9.5
2 Tylor,Theodore Henry ½
&;
1 0 ½ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 9.0
3 Abrahams,Gerald 0 0
&;
½ ½ 1 1 1w 1 1 1 1 8.0
4 Alexander,Conel Hugh O'D 0 1 ½
&;
0 1 1 1w 0 1 1 1 7.5
5 Thomas,George Alan 0 ½ ½ 1
&;
½ 1 0 1 ½ 1 1 7.0
6 Golombek,Harry 0 0 0 0 ½
&;
0 1w 1 1 1 1 5.5
7 Mortlock,Alfred 0 0 0 0 0 1
&;
1w 1 1 ½ 0 4.5
8 Winter,William 1 0 0d 0d 1 0d 0d
&;
½ 1 0d 1 4.5
9 Cross,Alfred Rupert Neale 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 ½
&;
1 1 ½ 4.0
10 Cole,Henry Holwell 0 0 0 0 ½ 0 0 0 0
&;
1 1 2.5
11 Colman,Eugene Ernest 0 0 0 0 0 0 ½ 1w 0 0
&;
½ 2.0
12 Jameson,Francis Noel 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 ½ 0 ½
&;
2.0

1w = walk-over
0d = default

Charles Wreford Brown played in 2 rounds, beating Jameson and drawing with Cole, but was then obliged to retire, his games being cancelled, and Mortlock being allowed to take his place.

William Winter retired through illness after 6 rounds.

1993 British Chess Championship

Prizes - £20 - £15 - £10 - £5. Non-prizewinners received 10s. for each game won.

1933 British Ladies Chess Championship

Prizes - £10 - £8 - £6 - £4. Non-prizewinners received 10s. for each game won.

[Linlithgow Gazette, 18 August 1933] "British Championship Tourneys. — The chess championship competitors (which concluded on Friday last) had a warm time at Hastings, as on all days, except the last, the weather was very hot. This affected two players as, after the second round, Mr Wreford-Brown had, by doctor's orders, to retire. His score was cancelled and his games replayed by A. Mortlock — the bov champion of 1928 — who did well and finished in seventh place. After the sixth round Mr Winter was taken ill. This was a great pity as he had scored 4½ out of 6 and was the only player to beat Sultan Khan. In this case the committee waited two days, but Winter could not resume, so his five unplayed games were scored as wins to his opponents. It is generally thought that Winter would have collected at least four more points from those five games.

"The extreme heat may have encouraged the two Indian players as Sultan Khan again won the men’s championship and Miss Fatima the ladies’. Her play has been remarkably good, especially in the end-game. Her score of 10½ out of 11 games played is possibly the best record in this event. The half-point she dropped was to a Scottish lady, Miss Crum. Regarding Miss Fatima, the London “Evening News” says:—“The Indian girl’s success is really remarkable as this is only her second appearance in the competition. Last year she finished sixth with 6½ points and as she is only just twenty-one she is already being hailed as a “second Miss Menchik.”

"Miss Fatima told me that she learned her chess in England and has been playing the game for about two years. Much of her tuition has been given by Dr Basalvi, a well-known London player. Sir Umar Hayat Khan must be very proud of having introduced Sultan Khan and Miss Fatima to English chess, and the ‘Double Indian’—a technical term in chess openings—takes on a new meaning now that both championships have been won by Sir Umar’s protegées who come from the traditional birthplace of the game."


[Western Mail - Saturday 12 August 1933] "NEW WOMAN CHESS CHAMPION - Indian Who Likes Game “Even Better Than Dancing” - Miss Fatima, a young Indian woman, looking little more than a girl and dressed in Eastern style, won the British women’s chess championship at Hastings. Her eleven opponents were mostly of many years’ experience, and included four former champions. Yet out of ten [sic - should be 11] games played she won nine [sic - should be 10] and drew one by remarkable play. No such score has ever been made in a series of similar contests extending over nearly thirty years. Miss Fatima has been for five years in England in the household of Sir Umar Hayat Khan in or near London, living a rather secluded life. She speaks only a little simple English, but with a pretty accent like a delightful child. - STARTED TWO YEARS AGO - She has been described as being still in her 'teens, but in an interview with a Western Mail reporter after her victory she admitted she was aged 21 years and one month. She learnt all her chess In England, having started playing, she said, only two years ago. She plays chess because she likes it, she said, "even better than dancing." Miss Fatima took part in the British women's championship contest last year in London, when she came out sixth, and her improvement in the interval has been astounding. Unfortunately, this is likely to be her last tournament in England, as, according to present arrangements, she is returning to India shortly." [n.b. if the information regarding Miss Fatima's age is correct, this suggests a date of birth circa July 1912. I have discovered from a ship's passenger list (Moldavia, sailing for Bombay on 29 December 1933) that her name was Ghulam Fatima and it gave her age as 20 - JS]


JS note: because of the Folkestone Team Tournament (Olympiad), I don't think any other sections were played as part of the Hastings event alongside the two championship sections (nothing is reported in BCM or the Times), but they did form part of the Folkestone event. Thus the following events were held at the Folkestone Town Hall from approx. 12-23 June 1933.

1933 British other events

1933 British Premier Reserves

Note, the remaining tables are not in score order, but in draw order...


File Updated

Date Notes
22 February 2016 First posted.
26 March 2016 Major upload of games and crosstables
23 June 2016 The complete score of Cole-Jameson (Rd 7) received from Brian Denman, for which many thanks.
12 June 2019 Added some text from the Linlithgow Gazette, 18 August 1933, and the Western Mail, 12 August 1933.