GAG Grant

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jbristow
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GAG Grant

Postby jbristow » Sat Mar 02, 2013 3:35 pm

GAG Grant. I was at RGS for for only just over two years (1948-50) and so don't have the range of memories of other contributors but one thing about GAG stands out. He would give 11/10 for homework he judged of exceptional quality. I couldn't draw a straight line with a ruler but my father was a qualified draughtsman and a superb water-colourist. He sometimes did my prep (I remember blackberry leaves were favoured because of their lovely colours) and I then got 11/10. Questions were raised after exam results of the order of 3/10, but I pleaded nerves.

John Bristow (I'm in the Gondoliers, Iolanthe, The Mikado and the 1949 photo)

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John Saunders
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Re: GAG Grant

Postby John Saunders » Sun Mar 03, 2013 4:24 pm

Image
John Saunders
RGS 1963-70 (personal website http://www.saund.co.uk)

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Re: GAG Grant

Postby John Saunders » Sun Mar 03, 2013 4:29 pm

The Wycombiensian, September 1958, published the above photograph and also the following tribute from ERT...

Boss Tucker in the September 1958 Wycombiensian wrote:MR. G. A. GRANT
At the end of the Summer Term, Mr. G. A. Grant completed forty years of service as a member of the school staff, and at the same time retired from the post which he had held here continuously since 1918, when he joined the staff after active service in the World War.

Mr. Grant's work here will be remembered for several things: first, the sound and reliable quality of his teaching, in which he exacted firm discipline, and always placed as much emphasis on the way in which a boy's character developed as on his academic progress; for the magnificent Hobby Club camps in which masters and boys participated, and which provided delightful holidays for about a hundred members of the school each summer between the wars; for the keen interest he took in school plays and operas for which he provided most effective sets and on which he worked assiduously throughout his time here; for his consistent loyalty to the school and his devotion to it; and for his pleasant relations with all members of the staff, old and young. It is a particular source of satisfaction to Mr. Grant that his work as Master in charge of Art is being taken over by an old boy of the school - one of his own pupils - Mr. M.J. Eaton, who joins us in September [1958].

Mr. Grant carries with him the warmest good wishes from us all for his retirement; may he and Mrs. Grant long enjoy the leisure that he has so richly earned.
John Saunders
RGS 1963-70 (personal website http://www.saund.co.uk)

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John Saunders
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Re: GAG Grant

Postby John Saunders » Sun Mar 03, 2013 6:12 pm

My brother was taught by 'Gaggy' Grant in his first year at the school (1957/58). He was the only member of staff who came anywhere close to rivalling PLJ's long stint as a master, being art teacher from 1918, after he left the services, to 1958. He and PLJ were on the Old Wycombiensians' committee to the end of their days, with GAG slightly outliving PLJ.

I think his full name was George Allan Grant and he was born on 30 September 1885, and died in the third quarter of 1971 at Amersham. I can't find out anything else about him at family history websites. (Not true! See Martin King's correction below - JS)
John Saunders
RGS 1963-70 (personal website http://www.saund.co.uk)

Martin King
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Re: GAG Grant

Postby Martin King » Fri Mar 22, 2013 11:46 am

I am sorry to have to disagree, but I do not think GAG was George Allan Grant, for various reasons, not the least being that if he was born in 1885, he would have been aged 73 when he retired in 1958.
George Allan Grant was born in Cheltenham in 1885, the son of a gardener. By 1901 he was also a gardener in Cheltenham. In 1911 he was an Under Gardener, Domestic, in Hatfield. He served as a Gunner in the Royal Garrison Artillery, and was promoted to 2/Lt and then Lieutenant in the Army Service Corps. He seems to have remained in the Army until October 1922, with an address in Highgate.

My contention is that GAG was actually George Alexander Grant, born in Newport Pagnell on May 6th 1892.
If he retired aged about 65 in 1958 this would be about right.
In 1901 he was living in Mottisfont, Hampshire, where his father was a schoolmaster.
In 1911 he was a student at Winchester Teacher Training College.
There is a George A. Grant who served as a corporal in the Hampshire Regiment (Territorial Force). On 18 March 1915 they landed at Basra with the 33rd Indian Brigade and remained in Mesopotamia and Persia for the rest of the war.
This might be his military detail because of the Hampshire connection, but there is no further information available.
His death was registered in Buckinghamshire in 1980.

I think on the balance of probabilities this is the G.A.Grant we knew at RGS.

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John Saunders
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Re: GAG Grant

Postby John Saunders » Fri Mar 22, 2013 1:06 pm

Detention for a thoroughly shoddy piece of family history work by Saunders Minor! Apologies to all, and many thanks to Martin for putting right my egregious error. What makes it worse is that I went on to do some more research after my post and found the guy was a gardener and almost certainly not our man, but completely forgot to return here and post a correction. Worse still, I became fixated on a 1971 date of death but I have returned to the Wycombiensian and discovered that it was GAG's wife who died thereabouts and not the man himself. Spring 1972 Wycombiensian - "old boys will be very sorry to hear that Mrs Grant died a short time after she and Mr. G.A. Grant had celebrated fifty years of marriage." This is actually an important genealogical clue - we need to look for a George Alexander Grant marrying around 1921/2, but I think I'll leave it to you, Martin, as I appear to be in poor genealogical form right now...
John Saunders
RGS 1963-70 (personal website http://www.saund.co.uk)

Martin King
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Re: GAG Grant

Postby Martin King » Fri Mar 22, 2013 3:25 pm

A slight problem here.
George A. Grant married Rose H. Perry in Eastbourne in 1921.
Rose Eleanor Perry was born in High Wycombe in 1897/98
Rose Elinor Grant, born 16 December 1897, died in Amersham in 1972
The places named are of course where the events were registered, not necessarily where they occurred.

I think these variations are due to mis-transcriptions, and relate to the right people.